Boys in Blue Dresses: Abnormal Becomes the New Normal–to the Abnormal

Gene Lalor | November 13, 2012 

Kelly Byrom: My Son Wore a  Proving that no one is required to take an I.Q. test or be licensed to bear children, Kelly Byrom’s young daughter “Firecracker” last Halloween was decked out as a dragon and her infant “Tornado” was dressed as an octopus.  However, she seemed most proud that her son “Twirl” wore a frilly blue dress–with fairy wings, no less–when he went trick-or-treating this year.  

Without mentioning the kids’ real names or ages–I would guess Firecracker to be about four, Tornado one and a half, and Twirl to be six or so–HuffPo.com posted an article titled, “My Son Wore a Dress for Halloween” by Ms. Byrom on its “Gay Voices” page on November 9th. 

Kelly Byrom  An apended editor’s note uselessly indicated that ”This post uses pseudonyms to protect the identities of minors,” even as HuffPo posted their pictures.  Byrom is an art director for CNN and HLNtv.com but apparently Huffpo never imagined that its readers could ever identify the kids whose names for all we know could be something like Mandarin Cracker, Cyclone, and Swivel. 

Kelly Byrom is anything but a typical suburban mother anymore than her children are typical suburban kids.  Most moms in the ‘burbs or elsewhere don’t indulge their progenies’ wild childhood fantasies and contribute to their normal gender confusion.  I can easily envision one or more of them some day marrying Perez Hilton or perhaps someone like openly homosexual actor Andrew Rannells on NBC’s “The New Normal” who presumptuously said to his gay lover in one episode, “Face it, honey.  Abnormal is the new normal.”  

But, back to Twirl/Swivel.

Kelly Byrom: My Son Wore a  Halloween 2012 was hardly the first occasion that he dressed in female garb. 

Last year, Twirl/Swivel was “obsessed” with Minnie Mouse and instead of suggesting he would make a cool Mickey his mom told him “that some people might just think he was a girl and that that was OK, and that he could correct them if he wanted to–or not.”  She  believes “maybe two or three people thought he was a girl, and he did correct them, and it was no big deal. . . We got some weird side looks, but thankfully no one said anything to him or to us in a negative tone. . . That is our society,” whatever that means. 

Kelly Byrom says that this year her son ”wanted to be a fairy. . . but the skirt he chose ”was really short! . . . I found myself saying something I would have said were it my daughter [that] seriously, it was really short.”  So Twirl/Swirl ultimately decided on a more discreet blue dress and glittery, purple Mary Janes shoes to complement his outfit which must have delighted the mother as much as they delighted her little son. 

The only downer in their Halloween festivities was a senior citizen who took one look at Twirl/Swirl and remarked, I guess “not in a negative tone,”  “I’m not even going to ask about that,” a comment which obviously reflected disapproval of dressing a little boy as a little fairy girl and annoyed his mom no end. 

She later asked her hubby what he thought about the seasoned citizen’s restrained comment and her hub reasonably observed that the older gent ”was likely just pointing out the uniqueness of the situation.”  She concluded, ”I don’t really care what that man thinks; I just wanted to have a good Halloween night.  And thanks to cooler heads, that’s exactly what we had.” (http://tiny.cc/0sfnnw

Atta girl, Kelly!  Ignore the one honest though muted observation that facilitating an impressionable boy-child to publicly appear in drag may not be exactly healthy for his developing psyche and may actually encourage him to believe he is androgynous or be mistaken for a human hermaphrodite. 

Unlike those with normal perceptions, Byrom realizes that today ”the abnormal is the new normal,” according to the abnormal.  She understands ”that is our society,” even as that society is rapidly sinking into a moral morass in which sexual freaks are dictating sexual norms.  She thinks that publicly exhibiting an innocent little boy as a little fairy girl is simply “unique” and not a twisted perversion.  She trusts in “cooler heads,” i.e. heads of people who think she’s certifiable but who want to avoid a confrontation with a nitwit.   

  P.T. Barnum would have loved to have featured Twirl/Swirl alongside his other oddities such as the Feejee Mermaid, Tom Thumb, and Chang and Eng and may have labeled Twirl/Swirl as “The Boy Who Thinks He’s a Girl.”  You have to wonder how Kelly Borum will react after he gets to middle school and high school, wears a pretty blue dress to class, and is driven to suicide by the taunts and ridicule of his classmates–all because his mom and dad didn’t sit him down when he was six years old and clued him into the fact he was a boy and should act that way.  

However, like the old guy, ”I’m not even going to ask about that.”


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